Category Archives: Reading

Top 100 Military Science Fiction Books

This is a repost of a list put together by my friend Cedar Sanderson based on recommendations from her readers. I’m honored to have Vengeance from Ashes, written under the pen name Sam Schall, included in the list.

mil SF art

Military transport drone
by LMorse

I realized that although I have made many lists of books, I have never done a list for military science fiction, one of my favorite sub-genres to read. An online friend asked about recommendations, so I did what I usually do, and crowdsourced the list-making. Over 300 comments later… No, not all of them were on-point. Thread drift is an art. But it was fun to watch the conversations spin off as folks learned about new books.

The following list I broke into two sections. The first, the top ten of MilSF, is ranked roughly according to how many people enthusiastically said “you must include…!” After that, there is no real order, just as they came in and I recorded them on the list. There are a few notes interspersed, some mine, and some from the people who recommended the books. As you will see, there are many series, but the links will go to the first book in a series, to introduce you to the author. Or to the author’s page, and you can decide from there.

Enjoy! I know I have a few more titles on my to-read list today.

Ominous Winds by Hideyoshi

Ominous Winds
by Hideyoshi

The Top Ten

 

  1. Robert Heinlein – Starship Troopers
  2. David Drake – Redliners
  3. John Steakley – Armor
  4. Jerry Pournelle – West of Honor
  5. John Ringo – Hymn Before Battle (Free!)
  6. Lois McMaster Bujold – Warrior’s Apprentice (link to Baen. The covers on Amazon of her books make me cry, they are so horrible. Buy them from Baen)
  7. David Drake – Hammer’s Slammers
  8. Orson Scott Card – Ender’s Game
  9. Keith Laumer – For the Honor of the Regiment
  10. David Weber – On Basilisk Station (Honor Harrington Series) Free Book!

 

Hyper G-One Confrontation by Hideyoshi

Hyper G-One Confrontation by Hideyoshi

Readers Recommend

 

  1. Dave Freer – Rats, Bats, and Vats
  2. Grossman and Frankowski – Two-Space War
  3. Dave Brin – Startide Rising, The Uplift War
  4. Peter Grant – Laredo Series
  5. John Dalmas – Soldiers
  6. Sam Schall – Vengeance from Ashes
  7. Leo Frankowski – The Crosstime Engineer, The High Tech Knight (they get a little worse with each one after that, IMO)
  8. Keith Laumer – The Cold Equations compilation (in addition to Bolo-verse)
  9. Zahn and Weber – Call to Duty
  10. E. “Doc” Smith – The Grey Lensman -verse, but especially the title book.
  11. John Varley – the last of the three Titan novels – Wizard
  12. M. Stirling – Any of the the Draka-verse, in particular, Marching Through Georgia and Stone Dogs
  13. Vernor Vinge – The Peace War, The Bubble War
  14. Ric Locke – Temporary Duty
  15. Jerry Pournelle – Janissaries, King David’s Spaceship Falkenberg’s Legion
  16. Niven and Pournelle – The Mercenary and West of Honor
  17. Gordon R Dickson – Three to Dorsai!
  18. Elizabeth Moon – Vatta’s War
  19. Jay Allan – Crimson Worlds
  20. Ian Douglas – Star Corpsman
  21. Elizabeth Moon – Serrano Series
  22. Michael Z Williamson – The Weapon (Freehold Series)
  23. Harry Turtledove – World War Series
  24. David Weber – Mutineer’s Moon
  25. Tom Kratman – Carrera series first book is free!
  26. LE Modessit – Forever Hero
  27. John F Carr – Uller Uprising (free book)
  28. John Campbell – Lost Fleet
  29. Niven – Man-Kzin Wars
  30. SM Stirling and David Drake – Raj Whitehall series
  31. Weber and Ringo – Empire of Man series
  32. Mike Shepherd – Kris Longknife
  33. John Birmingham – Axis of Time trilogy
  34. Joe Haldeman – The Forever War (note that other titles are not recommended)
  35. David Sherman and Dan Cragg – The Starfist Series
  36. John Scalzi – Old Man’s War (note that the sequels are not considered as good)
  37. Marko Kloos – Frontlines
  38. Christopher Nuttall – Empire Corps
  39. Doug Dandridge – Machine War
  40. Keith Laumer – Reteif’s War
  41. H Beam Piper – Space Viking (or, I’m told, anything by Piper, and I’d agree) Free Book!
  42. Robert Asprin – Phule’s Company (a rare humor book in the genre)
  43. Sandra McDonald – The Outback Stars
  44. Joel Shepherd – Crossover
  45. Steve Perry – the Man Who Never Missed
  46. Thorarin Gunnarson – Starwolves
  47. Andre Norton – Star Soldiers
  48. Timothy Zahn – Cobra Series first book is free
  49. Dietz – Legion of the Damned
  50. MCA Hogarth – Spots the Space Marine
  51. ZA Recht – Morningstar Saga
  52. Correia and Kupari – Dead Six
  53. JL Bourne – Day by Day Armageddon
  54. WJ Lundy – The Darkness
  55. EE Doc Smith – Lensman Series
  56. Robert Frezza – A Small Colonial War
  57. McCaffrey, Moon, and Nye – Planet Pirates
  58. Flint and Drake – Belisarius Series
  59. Chris Bunch – STEN series
  60. Mike Smith – The Last Praetorian
  61. John F Holmes – Irregular Scout Team One
  62. Sabrina Chase – The Long Way Home
  63. Mike Resnick – Starship series
  64. Jean Johnson – Theirs not to Reason Why
  65. Tanya Huff – Valor series
  66. Taylor Anderson – The Destroyermen series
  67. David Feintuch – Hope series
  68. H Paul Honsinger – To Honor You Call Us
  69. Fred Saberhagen – Beserker series
  70. Leo Frankowski – Cross-Time Engineer
  71. William R Forstchen – Lost Regiment
  72. BV Larson – the Star Force series
  73. Brad Torgerson – The Chaplain’s War
  74. Thomas DePrima – A Galaxy Unknown
  75. Elliot Kay – Poor Man’s Fight
  76. Jamie McFarlane – Privateer Tales
  77. GP Hudson – The Pike Chronicles
  78. Dan Abnett – Ravenor series
  79. Daniel La Cruz – Aye’s of Texas
  80. Niven and Pournelle – Footfall
  81. Dan Abnett – Gaunt’s Ghosts
  82. Ringo (editor) – Citizens
  83. Poul Anderson and Gordon R Dickson – Hoka!
  84. Michael Stackpole – Battletech books
  85. David Drake – Leary Series
  86. Roland Green – Peace Company
  87. Mark E Cooper – Merkiaari Wars
  88. Thomas A Mays – REMO
  89. Travis Taylor and John Ringo – LookingGlass series
  90. Sarah Hoyt – A Few Good Men
Carrier Concept by Kheng

Carrier Concept by Kheng

For more awesome SFF art check this out.

Oops!

I am sorry this post is late today. Life has gotten in the way, but in a good way. 🙂 I had a fantastically lazy and relaxing Thanksgiving weekend. I didn’t worry about very much (for a change) except reading my book and getting caught up on some chilled out family time. With all that laid back time, I just didn’t get my post done this weekend.

Then last night I went to see a production of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, starring Sir Kenneth Branagh and Dame Judi Dench, broadcast from the Garrick theatre in London’s West End through a Fathom Events Live special showing at a local movie theater. It is a treat to see something like this, or NT Live’s Coriolanus, which I have seen a few times in local movie theaters. I have seen a few others and am also thinking I will HAVE to check out the Fathom Events Live broadcast of Sherlock – The Abominable Bride that will be here in the US in January.  With all the excitement of seeing the play, I didn’t manage to get anything written by the time the play was over at almost 10:30.

So even though this is late, I wanted to share a story with you from my super relaxing long weekend. Before we go to sleep at night, we take turns reading to the kids. They can read on their own, but there is something about having that time, reading aloud to the kids to get them to sleep. I have one book I’m reading to the twins and I had another I was reading for quite awhile to my oldest. He had gotten the book, The One and Only Ivan, on his school librarian’s recommendation, at the last book fair at school. We always end up spending a boatload at those book fairs by the way. 🙂

We read this book for a little while, though it is a children’s book with very short chapters. (I love short chapters for night time reading sessions!) The story is basically about this gorilla, Ivan, who has lived his life in a small cage, not in a zoo or in the wild, but doesn’t seem to mind too much until he meets a baby elephant named Ruby who needs his help. He makes a promise to his friend Stella the elephant to help save Ruby.

It’s a sweet and easy read, which I’d recommend reading, regardless of your age. What I wanted to share with you, though, was that I had one of those ugly cry moments (as Oprah might say) reading it to my son. I thought he was asleep so I’m just all choked up and unable to get any words out, then I look over and see he is waiting patiently for me to continue. It took me a few minutes to get myself under control enough to finish reading it to him.

I admire writers who can tell a story that makes a reader feel so strongly as to break into an ugly cry. I admire writers who can make a reader feel sad, or happy, or even angry reading their stories. The book I was reading myself over the weekend wasn’t the Great American Novel, but rather a feel good romance novel I knew exactly what to expect from the author as soon as I checked it out from the library.  This author may not give me much that is unexpected, but she manages to stir the emotions up from time to time in each book of hers I read.

I like reading books that make me feel and hope to be the writer that manages that for my readers someday.

Thanks for stopping by and for your forgiveness for the lateness.

Have a great week!

~CJS

A little Halloween Reading

With Halloween sneaking up on us in just a few days, my household has been entrenched in anything resembling spooky. My yard has been transformed into a haunted graveyard, with skeletons and spiders hanging from tree branches. Thankfully, this year the dog caught on quickly that these bones were not his chew toys. Unthankfully, I hate spiders and we have one huge brown one that just freaks me out anytime it catches my peripheral. Ghosts and jack o’lanterns are set about my living room, wreaking havoc on my cats. We made our annual trip to the pumpkin patch, where we brought home pumpkins that outweigh my youngest – oh how I am dreading the de-gutting of those. Costumes are ready and waiting to be worn and soiled.

Yes, we are ready for Halloween at the Prince residence.

Another part of our ritual is during the entire month of October, we collect books and stories from the library that revolve around goblins, ghosts, witches, and anything else that jumps in the night. Even the school has gotten on board with tying the fun of dressing up with reading. We have story book character day in our district where each child has can dress up, but must bring a book about that character. (I will be honest, I find this to be a good concept of an idea, but extremely annoyed at how they go about it.)

During this month, I tend to read more in the horror genre than I do at any other time of year. There are so many great books tagged as horror, that it was hard to really narrow one down. Last year I read a few horror books, but the classic Mary Shelley’s, Frankenstein was the one that stuck out for me the most. So this year I decided to read Bram Stoker’s, Dracula.

And I chose well.

Books written around this time period generally are written in journal/diary format. This seems to be how the writers were able to jump point of views easily and tell a story in a way that felt natural to them. It is not my favorite form of literature, but it works well for this book. It’s like piecing a puzzle together, and I enjoy that aspect.

The story itself is creepy in a very simplistic way almost. It doesn’t slap you in the face with the horror of what is happening, which so many books do. Instead it’s a slow and subtle build up that gives you chills when you picture what is unfolding in front of you. Take the character Lucy for example. At first I thought Lucy was just a side character with very little importance, but as the story grows, so does her part in it, until she is no longer of any importance.

Stories now days tend to be more graphically descriptive than they used to be. This tends to be a good and a bad thing, in my opinion. But there are some great descriptors that are so simple but paint a vivid picture right in front of you. There is this scene where Dracula scales the side of the castle like a lizard, and you can’t help but imagine what it would be like to be able to do that!

So do your reading/writing habits change during the Holidays? What are you reading right now? Let us know in the comments, we’d love to hear what you have to say.

Till next time,

~AJP

A New Twilight?

This past week, Stephanie Meyer, the best-selling author of the teen vampire series, Twilight, upon which the blockbuster movies were based, made a big announcement.

With the 10 year anniversary of the first Twilight books’ publication, Meyer has announced a new Twilight book, Life and Death – A Twilight Re-Imagining sold in conjunction with the 10th anniversary edition . Well, it’s not really *new*, it’s a new version of the first book.

This release is not like her unreleased and incomplete version that was leaked and then given for free on her site at one point, Midnight Sun, which was told from Edward’s POV. The new re-telling is the same story with – wait for it- gender swapped characters! (Cue eye roll).

In this new book, Meyer now has the teenage vampire as a female character and the love struck human as a male. Instead of Bella, we have a Beau. Instead of Edward, we have Edythe. Other characters are also gender swapped, like Carlyle, but the story is the same.

Meyer has said that this “new book” is not really a new book and she views it as more like “bonus material”, however new book or not, it will get a lot of sales I would imagine, given the series success.

Here I will admit I enjoyed the Twilight books. I know, the writing wasn’t good. I know she totally ignored the vampire tropes and gave the world the sparkling vegatarian vampire. (Cringe) I know the female lead isn’t the strong character I prefer to read about and see portrayed in film. I know. But I enjoyed them. Yes, part of this had to do with liking the British actor who portrayed Edward in the movies. (I love the Brits okay?) It absolutely had to do with the fun of the first movie and the great soundtrack. For all of the books’ (and movies’) faults, I enjoyed them. Chalk it up to guilty pleasures if you must. I’m coming clean here. I liked Twilight. Judge me all you want. 😉

Having admitted to that, I can tell you I think it is absolutely ludicrous to re-tell the same story with changes. I’ve seen her defense that it’s a response to the harsh critisism she’s faced with her ‘damsel in distress’ main character. I think the flaws with Bella go beyond a simple gender swap to play with the weakness not being female. If she wants to respond to giving us a weak female character, she should write something entirely new with a kick-ass female lead.

If she wanted to capitalize on her well-loved existing series, she could take one of her other characters in the world she has already created and explore her story. Alice was a cool and capable character that she could make the heroine in a new series. It could still be in the same world people are already plugged into and could be either before Bella or after Bella.

She hasn’t done that with this new “book/bonus material”, so I have no interest in reading it. I hope for her that she gives her audience a better option in the future. Better yet, perhaps all the readers who fell in love with Twilight can continue enjoying all the great books that have been published since in the same young adult category that are really worth the read. Susanne Collins’ Hunger Games series is fantastic and has a kick-ass female lead. Marie Lu’s Legend series is a great read. Ally Condie’s Matched series is also great and her prose is beautiful. Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments and Infernal Devices Series are both captivating. (The Infernal Devices series was my personal favorite between those two series, by far.) I also enjoyed the very popular Divergent series but didn’t like the writing as much as others. The YA audience has a wealth of strong options to choose from, so I would say, let’s just skip this “new” Twilight book and look nearby on the shelves for another instead. 😀

What do you think? (Amanda and AJ you don’t get to chide me for my Twilight guilty pleasure! 😉 ) Is a re-tooling of an existing story ever a good idea? Does her gender swap accomplish anything? Should successful series ever be re-visited? I’d love to hear about it in the comments. (No, Amanda, nothing about the Twi-Hatred you may have haha).

Thanks for reading. Have a great week!

~CJS

Challenge the Banned

The week of September 27 – October 3 is banned books week. Twitter has been filled with funny tweets from publishers and readers alike. Libraries have set out the books banned in the past, front and center for you to read a “banned book”.

It seems ridiculous really, the idea of banning a book, to me anyway. In school, had I been told that I could not read a book, the first thing I would have done was have my mother find it for me so that I could read it. My mom knew better than to tell me that I couldn’t read something, because then I would have had my grandmother go out and find it for me so that I could read it.

We can look back at the past and laugh on the idiosyncrasies of the times before us. They were naïve, they didn’t know any better, or it was just the world they lived in.

But.

Even today, we have schools and parents who challenge books. You can find a list of them here. In a world that parents turn a blind eye and let kids flaunt themselves in public, on social media, they get their pants in a twist because their children could be reading something that would dirty their minds.

Preposterous.

I understand censoring for age-appropriateness, I wouldn’t read to my six-year-old a book in the age group for my 12-year-old, nor would I read a book full of sex to my 12-year old. As their parent, that is my job. Emphasis on the word my.

The world is a fishbowl of situations and people. We do not all fit into a mass mold, and we cannot expect our children to come from the same generic template either. They have to be able to read about situations that they ever never had to experience firsthand.

It seems the books on this list were banned because the subjects/topics that were written about made someone uncomfortable. Let’s take To Kill a Mockingbird for example (it is the most recent that I’ve read); it has been called degrading, full of profane and racist language and actions, and so much more.

This book was so much more than about race; it was also about the integrity of the human race – or lack of in some cases, prejudice, poverty, discrimination and the fact that we struggle to see past our own front yard some days.

But it was a good book. Not because it was full of happy go lucky times, not because it took me to a different time and made me feel good. No, in fact, many scenes made my stomach twist up in a sickening rage. It took me to a time and a place that was uncomfortable. It made me see things through a different point of view.

This hasn’t been a book that my eldest has had to read for school yet, I wonder if it will be on the list at some point. There have been others that bring light to uncomfortable circumstances. It is not taught so that they grow up and become like what they read in the book. No, it is to bring light to situations that are gritty and controversial so that maybe our kids can learn from them. Be better because of them.

I will never understand the idea of banning or challenging a book. Everyone needs to be able to read an experience for themselves. The idea of a school or a person telling me what my kids can or cannot read would tick me off.

The idea of being told what I should or should not write about would tick me off. The world isn’t a neat little package, wrapped up waiting for us like on Christmas morning. Therefore, we shouldn’t have to write like that either. And by banning a book, isn’t that what they are trying to say/do? Tell us that we shouldn’t have written about that.

Check out these websites to view the different lists of banned or challenged books.

Here is a list of Banned Books that Shaped America: (The bolded ones are books that reside on my bookshelf.)

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain, 1884

The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Malcolm X and Alex Haley, 1965 (Grove Press)

Beloved, Toni Morrison, 1987

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, Dee Brown, 1970

The Call of the Wild, Jack London, 1903

Catch-22, Joseph Heller, 1961

The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger, 1951

Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury, 1953

For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway, 1940

Gone With the Wind, Margaret Mitchell, 1936

The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck, 1939

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1925

Howl, Allen Ginsberg, 1956In Cold Blood, Truman Capote, 1966

Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison, 1952

The Jungle, Upton Sinclair, 1906

Leaves of Grass, Walt Whitman, 1855

Moby-Dick; or The Whale, Herman Melville,1851

Native Son, Richard Wright, 1940

Our Bodies, Ourselves, Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, 1971

The Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane, 1895

The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1850

Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, Alfred C. Kinsey, 1948

Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein, 1961

A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams, 1947

Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston, 1937

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, 1960

Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1852

Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak, 1963

The Words of Cesar Chavez, Cesar Chavez, 2002

 

What is your favorite banned/challenged book? Let me know down in the comments, we’d love to hear from you.

Till next time,

~AJP

Check out these websites to view the different lists of banned or challenged books.

http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/

http://www.loc.gov/bookfest/books-that-shaped-america/

http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/

A Creator of Words

“It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to Live.” – Albus Dumbledore

  

This past weekend, I skipped my writer’s group meeting so that my husband and I could take our kids to see a showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in theatres. I know, I know, skipping a writing meeting is generally unheard of.

But… Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone was showing in the theatre. That hasn’t happened since 2001!

Now, my kids have grown up with a mother who absolutely loves all things Harry Potter, so this was not the first time that they have seen this movie. Nor was it the second, third, fourth, or… you get the idea. But it was the first time they were able to experience it on the big screen.

And they were amazed.

The first time I saw this movie was the weekend that it was released. My husband (then fiancé) and I were joining part of my family for a movie night, and at the time this was the only interesting kid friendly movie showing. I had never heard of this Harry Potter and his magical world and just needed something that my (under ten) siblings could agree on. They are now in their 20’s and probably do not even remember going. Later that same weekend, I drug my mother and another younger sibling to see it. After that, the rest was history.

We immediately went out and purchased the first book. As in the next day. A few days later, we bought the second. And so on. The movie had been spectacular, but the books were/are better. By the time the series was fully released, I had babies of my own. My son has his own collection of the books and the movies, and I have a collection of the books saved for my daughter for when she is able to read them on her own.

Now, I am sure there is someone out there that didn’t care for the series, but I haven’t met them yet. As I am also aware that there are plenty of people who liked the series, read them, even watched the movies and that was that. It was just another book/movie for them.  I have read or listened on audio to the series more times than I care to share with you.

Everyone is different. There are those who fall back on Shakespeare, Austen, Fitzgerald, Tolkien; there is a creator of words out there for anyone and everyone. You just have to be willing to find who speaks the loudest to you. Me, I’m just a Rowling girl.

One day, one of us might become one of those authors for someone. One never knows.

Who/what speaks the loudest to you? Let me know down in the comments, I’d love to hear from you.

Till next time,

~AJP

Are You Reading?

The MORE that you Read,
the more THINGS you will KNOW.
The MORE you LEARN,
the more PLACES you’ll GO!
~Dr. Seuss

It’s not a secret that I love to read (mentioned in a previous post). And to write, you have to read.

Here lately, I find myself reading probably more than I do anything else. While I work, I listen to e-audio books on my iPad, instead of music. I have three (very thick and large) school books that I read during my breaks, lunch and after work & class. On the nights that I do not have class, I read to my youngest – right now we are on a Halloween and Christmas kick. And then I try and get in a few minutes of non-homework reading right before bed.

I am also not one to stick to reading one book at a time either. At any given time, I could be reading one to five books at a time. This might seem like too much to some, but it works for me. There are days where a story just doesn’t hold my interest, but calls me back to it another day.

And I will admit, finding these e-book audios on the library’s website has saved my sanity at work. A person can only listen to music for so long before the singing starts to wear on ones nerves.

Right now I am listening to…

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling (I have been rereading the series with a friend of mine who has never read them before! I know, I know. How could one have never read these before? It is not from lack of trying on my part.)

And I am reading…

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Someday, Someday, Maybe by Lauren Graham

So what are you reading right now? Let me know down in the comments, I love seeing what others are reading.

Till next time,
~AJP

6 Things Every Booklover Knows

Since Jesi wrote yesterday’s post on how you have to write to be a writer, and my writing life hasn’t been at it’s strongest these last few weeks, I chose to make today’s post about another vital component in the life of a writer. Yep, you guessed from the title, it’s reading.

Stephen King has one of my favorite quotes on the interconnectedness of being a good writer and being a committed reader.

Reading is the creative center of a writer’s life…you cannot hope to sweep someone else away by the force of your writing until it has been done to you.

– Stephen King

Of course I was a booklover long before I became a writer. I loved books for as long as I can remember. I can remember wanting to run away and live in a museum when I read From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler in elementary school. I can remember my favorite part of the day when my fifth grade teacher would sit and read to us from Shel Silverstein’s collections of poems. I can remember sitting in my sophomore English class, reading silently with all the others, but forgetting where I was as I cried reading the end of Chaim Potok’s The Chosen. I remember the all the joys of discovering new favorite authors and series along the way and the accompanying thrill of falling into new worlds and lives of interesting characters.

So what does every true booklover know about themselves and the greatness that is being a bibliophile?

1) There is NO SUCH THING as too many books.

Any true booklover knows that it’s impossible to have too many books. Our TBR list (to be read list) is always overflowing. Our bookshelves are always crammed full and double stacked. Our storage spaces frequently have more books that couldn’t fit on the bookshelves. Our friends don’t like to help us move because we are “book people” – thus we have many boxes that are super heavy. We download books on our kindles. We carry books around with us when we go to the doctor or the mechanic or the Sunday morning breakfast place that always has a wait. We ask our friends for book recommendations. We get books for our birthday or Christmas presents because our friend’s know we will love them. We love to spend time at the bookstore looking for something new, even when we have a hundred other books we still have yet to read. We can just never have too many books. 🙂

2) Just one more chapter almost NEVER means just one more chapter.

We stay up way too late, way too often because we just have to see what happens next. We tell ourselves just one more chapter, but we know this is a lie. We read one more chapter and then we know we need another and another and when the writer is really good we have to finish it all. Being swept away, as King says, is one of the joys of reading because even if we can’t literally escape our lives, we can disappear into another life whenever we want to pick up a good book.

3) Emotional trauma at the end of a good book or series is REAL.

When we find a good book or series, we have the inevitable conflict where we both want to finish it, but also really don’t want to finish it. We can’t wait to find a new favorite book or series but then when it is over, we wish we could find it again for the first time. We are reluctant to leave a world or a character so much so that we frequently have to return, sometimes again and again, but still the sadness of no new material like it can be heartbreaking.

4) The book is ALWAYS better.

We booklovers know that the book is always better than a movie or TV adaptation. We know it is hard to let go of the sheer volume of detail in the books, the ideas we have about those details, and the attachment we have to all the details. A movie cuts a major character. Unforgiveable. A TV show takes the series in a whole different direction that the books have taken you. Not unexpected but frequently disappointing. However faithful the movie/TV/whatever is to the books, the books are always better.

5) A good book can come in ALL shapes and sizes and formats.

Booklovers know that it doesn’t really matter if the book is traditionally printed, independently printed, electronically printed, 1000 pages, 5o pages, paperback, trade paperback, hard cover or coffee table sized, we love them all. Sure we may have our preference, maybe we even hold strong opinions about which are better than the other, but we book lovers will always come together on that big thing we can all agree upon, a lifelong love of books.

6) A good book CAN change your life.

We booklovers know the power that books have had in our lives. We have seen the impact books have had on those around us. We find truth in books that we may not be able to find in other places. We seek comfort in the books we read. We laugh, we cry, we get angry, and we get scared. We get new information, we get new ideas, and we get inspiration from the pages of good books. We find others who share the same love. We find places we want to explore, foods we would like to taste, and things we’d like try. We learn about ourselves and others. And sometimes we find a book has changed our life.

Are you a booklover? Any of these sound like you? Is there something I’ve left off the list? Please tell me about it in the comments. Thanks for reading and have a good week!

~CJS

Kids Need To Read

BORED

HASNT MOVED

Enough said!

Unemotionally Attached

I am sitting here with absolutely nothing to post about today. My mind has been preoccupied with new and old story lines, trying to edit something for an upcoming workshop, and dealing with Month End issues at work. So as I sit here, wracking my brain with something – anything- to blog about, my mind keeps going back to CJ’s post yesterday.

It was a good post, and I loved reading her point of view on the matter regarding the recent publication of Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. CJ linked to some great articles giving you an insight on the drama that has been circled around Ms. Lee here of late.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a book that a lot of people hold dear, something they remember fondly reading while growing up. So the idea of this new book painting Atticus as a different man than he was in TKAM is unfathomable to some.

But what if you don’t hold To Kill a Mockingbird dear?

I don’t.

Up until a year ago, I never put much thought into the book other than it was a classic that I would get around to reading someday. Then last year at the end of a writers meeting with my group, Joe mentioned that his favorite novel of all time was To Kill a Mockingbird, we discussed it for a minute before departing and that was it.

Then over the holidays, I was out with my grandfather and we were browsing the books when we came across a used copy for a dollar and he said he remembered reading it when he was younger. I asked what he thought about it and he encouraged me to buy the book and find out for myself. So I bought the book and proceeded to shelve it.

Now I am not sure if he came across one of the many news articles about Harper Lee and her books recently or not, but he asked the other day if he could borrow the book from me. Seeing as how I still hadn’t read it, I figured I needed to do so quickly so that he can have a go. Then I mentioned to my grandmother about Go set a Watchman being released and all of the negativity surrounding it. We decided to read To Kill a Mockingbird together since she hadn’t read it in so long and, well, since I still hadn’t read it at all.

After we finish TKAM, we will probably read Go Set a Watchman together.

If the articles are true and that Ms. Lee was not of sound mind in letting this “draft” be published, then that’s a damn shame. But. What if she was? None of us really know except for Harper Lee herself.

I am not emotionally attached to either of these books in any way. After all is said and done, I probably will be, but come on, I am reading them with my grandparents – who both read To Kill a Mockingbird willingly as adults when it was first released. How cool is that? And now I will get to share Go set a Watchman with them too. We might hate it. We might not. No one can find out until they read it.

So now that I’ve got CJ and JesiKay shaking their heads at me… What are your thoughts on the matter? Share with us in the comments, we’d love to hear what you have to say.

~AJP

(Once I finish To Kill a Mocking bird AND Go Set a Watchman, I’ll let you know if I loved/hated either of them.)