When you want to just stop

The other day, a writer in one of the online groups I belong to posted that he was ready to just chuck the whole writer-thing because he hadn’t liked his first day sales (and he went on to give us the number of sales made). I’ll admit, my first reaction was to reach through the screen and shake him because the number, while not best seller level was higher than most indie writers will ever see in a single day. Then I decided that wasn’t the best course of action and thought I’d take a look at what he had just put out and talk to him from a reader’s standpoint.

This writer’s work falls into a very particular sub-genre, or at least that is what his titles suggest. So that presents the first challenge for him. He titles his books one way but the covers cue something completely different. That confuses the potential reader. Are they going to get a book about X, as the title suggests, or about Y, which is what the cover cues?

Then there was the confusion raised by his Amazon listing. Doing a search by his name turns up a number of titles. That’s a good thing. Even better is that the new book is the first thing showing. But the second thing showing is a compilation of his work that says it includes all of the series in question. Hmm. So is the first title really a new one or is it included in the compilation that is a better buy? More confusion.

All of which can be easily fixed by making some changes to the cover images for the series and the copy on the cover and in the product descriptions.

But what about his complaint about sales from an author’s standpoint. He had expected sales at least ten times higher than they were. His conclusion about why sales were so bad was that Facebook has changed its algorithm that determines not only who sees your posts but how many people see them. You see, he has a large and active Facebook page and he had relied on that in the past for his promotion.

The problem with doing this is multi-fold. First, as noted, Facebook has changed its model concerning who sees your post. You should never put your main promotion effort into something that you have absolutely no control over and that changes how it does things more often than you change underwear (okay, an exaggeration but not by much). Even if you knew our promotion posts were going out to every one of your followers, they aren’t all going to look at it. Either they won’t get notice that you posted something or they are busy and don’t go to Facebook that day or they scroll past it, etc.

But there is another problem with putting most of your emphasis on promoting to people who are already “fans”. (I put that in quotes for a reason. All too often, people who join an author’s fan group have never read the author’s work or read only one or two books and then move on to other authors. They hang around because they like the interplay in the forum.) You have, hopefully, already won over those people and they will buy your work whether you promote it on the page or not. What we have to do is look for new readers to expand our fan base. So we have to look for new ways to find them. Social media posts are one way but not everyone is on Twitter, Reddit, Facebook, Google +, etc. Blogging helps, especially if you can get guests blog gigs on other, more popular blogs than your own. Getting those who have read your work to post honest reviews on Amazon and elsewhere also help. But they have to be HONEST reviews.

And, when you see your sales for a certain title declining, you have to be able to look at it with a critical eye and figure out why. Is it the normal slump that happens after a book has been out for awhile? If so, that means you had better have another book ready to go pretty darn soon or your audience will move on to another author and they might not think to come back to you. Is your cover still cuing the right genre or sub-genre? This is something I’ve had to look at of late with regard to my Nocturnal Lives series. The covers were spot on for genre cuing when they first came out. Now, not so much. So the books will be re-released over the next few weeks with new covers. This will be done in coordination with the release of the next book in the series. Is your product description something that hooks the reader? Does it look professional (I see far too many where there is no spacing between paragraphs, leaving you to read a wall of text. Not good.

In other words, instead of throwing your hands up and threatening to walk away because a book isn’t selling as well right out the gate as you think it should, look at what you have done to write, edit, package and promote it with a critical eye. Writing is a business, something we tend to forget about all too often. We have to treat it as such. And, on that happy note, I need to get back to work. I have editing jobs to finish before I can write.

3 responses to “When you want to just stop

  1. I’m going to try and be calm and objective if Jenny gets published and doesn’t do as well as I’d like. It is a first novel. I don’t have a fan base. I’ll only have had one book out. And I really just don’t know how to promote myself.
    I’m working hard on that second one so that, hopefully, there isn’t too much time between books.
    I do remember you saying that you need about 10 to 13 books out there before the money starts getting serious. I’ll have to keep that in mind, too.

    • Joe, I am working on rebuilding my edits on Jenny after the computer crash. But, damn, real life has been kicking me in the teeth. Give me another couple of days and pray for no more floods, 911 calls or anything else happening.

      As for how Jenny will do, I have a feeling it will do well but it may be a long road to get there. It does take time to build an audience and I do think you will be well served to have some titles in the same general genre ready to go at close intervals to the publication date of Jenny. Those can be short stories and novellas to bridge the gap until the next novel comes out.

  2. Great Tips. As Authors we often forget about the many hats we wear. This includes publicist, marketing director, financial planner, and more.

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